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How to Design (With the inner sense of roots)

Synagogue at Tallinn. Source: Google images

Synagogue at Tallinn. Source: Google images

The Jewish ancient candelabrum, menorah, classically had seven branches, thus I was considering changing the picture of my previous posting. But I didn’t, because the later Hanukkah menorah has nine branches – a branch for a candle for each of the eight days of Hanukkah and the shamash (“helper or servant”) for a candle used to light all other candles. Hanukkah, often held parallelly to Christmas, is also known as Jewish alternative to the Christmas celebrations.

From the window of my room in the hall of residence of the Tallinn University I see the building of the synagogue with its walls almost entirely of glass. The synagogue has been built with such a care that the care almost feels. And strange, even a look at this perfect building has a healing effect.

A modern Tiffany Hanukkah menorah. Source: Wikipedia

A modern Tiffany Hanukkah menorah. Source: Wikipedia

Today, I attended the Annual Meeting of the European Law Association of the Estonian Lawyers Association that took place in the meeting room of the Estonian Supreme Court at Tartu. Discussed were the proposed general topics to the FIDE 2012 Conference that takes place in Tallinn, as well as the potential conference discussion questions.



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