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Sharing Teaching Materials?

Source: Google

Source: Google

The ASIL Teaching International Law Interest Group, in cooperation with the Society’s Legal Education Advisory Committee, has created a trial compilation of teaching materials on a limited number of international law topics. The materials are available at http://www.asil.org/search.cfm?displayPage=1149  

How to approach such sharing? Wouldn’t it be plagiarism if a lecturer uses other lecturer’s teaching aids? To what extent would such sharing be tolerated?

I think that such compilations are a valuable source advancing science – because sometimes one just needs a push to go forward with his / her own ideas. The receivers in study processes are students who have the right to receive the best education available. From the other side – a lecturer must critically analyse other lecturers’ study materials and methods, because the lectures are, for example, not peer-reviewed, usually no references are made to the scientific sources used, all lecturers are humans, humans cannot be objective and err.

I already found some valuable hints – Instead of producing written lecture materials, some lecturers encourage the students to do independent work, indicating only the pages or cases to be read in order to master the topics:

An example (excerpt of professor Westerman’s Syllabus):

PART ONE: THE CONSTITUTIVE PROCESS IN THE GLOBAL

COMMUNITY CONTEXT (Classes 2-4 approx.)

I. How Shall We Conceive International Law?

Read pp. 1-13

II. How International Law is Made and Applied: A Nuclear Scenario

Read and Brief pp. 13-28;

notes pp. 33-36

Read and Brief pp. 36-73

Read and Brief pp. 73-103

III. The Interaction Between International and National Actors in Applying

International Law

Read and Brief pp. 103-140

Read and Brief new case on Medellin (cite to be provided)

And a nostalgic link to Sunday’s sense of humour: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_-p8bOoFlPo



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